UKERC ENERGY DATA CENTRE




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Roadmaps

"Where we should be going"

The Roadmaps are classified by IEA Energy Category

Last updated: 1 July 2014

ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Transport

Roadmap Synthesis

Strategies and Roadmaps for Sustainable Energy Use for Transport
2007 (PDF 160 KB)

Roadmap Characterisations

FOSSIL FUELS: OIL, GAS and COAL : CO2 Capture and Storage

UKERC Roadmaps

The UKERC/UKCCSC Carbon Capture and Storage Roadmap
Stuart Haszeldine, October 2007 (PDF 500 K)

Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is one of the large scale  technologies which may enable the UK, and the world, to make deep cuts  in Greenhouse Gas emissions from electricity generating power plant  which is fuelled by gas or coal. The UK is amongst the world leaders  in developing a fully integrated chain of CCS from power plant  combustion and capture, to transport, to storage of CO2 in pores of  sedimentary rock deep beneath the North Sea.

This Report contains the results from a questionnaire survey of  stakeholders and participants in Industry, Government, Academia and  environmental NGO's followed by a two day workshop in mid 2007 with a  representative group of invited experts.  The UK has not developed a  formal "Road Map" of pathways and problems on the way to deploying CCS  at industrial scale.  This Report is a first step towards that Road  Map, and was compiled by university members of the UK Energy Research  Centre, together with the UK Carbon Capture and Storage Consortium.   The Report takes a deliberately wide view of CCS, to consider not just  specific technologies, but also issues such as legality, licensing,  monitoring requirements, business model, and social acceptability.  A  theme is the timelines necessary for CCS to develop in order to reach  routine deployment as a fully commercial technology by 2020.

In November 2007, the Government, through BERR, is expected to  announce a competition to win UK state aid in support of the first UK  CCS demonstration of one or more integrated project(s). This will be  at full industrial scale, and will be amongst the first in the world  to be constructed.  The winner(s) of the competition will be announced  in late 2008.  The intervening period will draw a focus onto the  diverse issues of CCS applied to the UK.  Consequently, by end-2009 it  is anticipated that this provisional Road Map (still undergoing formal  peer review) will need substantial modification.  The UKERC Road Map  can provide integrated input to the rapidly developing emergence of  CCS as a new UK energy industry.

Roadmap Synthesis

Roadmap Characterisations

Renewables: Solar Energy

UKERC Roadmaps

UKERC Research Road Map for Photovoltaics (PV)
David Infield, August 2007 (PDF 290 KB)

This document provides a road map for Photovoltaics (PV) research in the UK.  It is specific to the UK and reflects the strengths and weaknesses of the research base, although it is compatible with the roadmaps of other countries, particularly the one recently developed for the European Community.  Its primary aim is to identify priority areas for UK PV research and assist the research funding agencies, particularly EPSRC, BERR (formerly DTI) and the Carbon Trust, in developing their research programmes, but it also considers the need to develop UK capacity, both in terms of expertise and research facilities. Researchers are encouraged to use the document as part of lobbying for PV research funding.

Roadmap Synthesis

Roadmap Characterisations

Renewables: Wind Energy

UKERC Roadmaps

Record of the UKERC-supported Wind Energy Research Road Mapping meeting
David Infield, January 2013 (PDF 320 KB)

This document provides both a record of a UKERC-sponsored wind energy road-mapping meeting held in March 2009 (with the resulting list of research topics), and an updated commentary written in December 2012. Its primary aim is to identify priority areas for UK wind energy research and assist the research funding agencies, particularly EPSRC, BIS, ETI and the Carbon Trust, in developing their research programmes. The document also considers the need to develop UK capacity, both in terms of expertise and research facilities.

Roadmap Synthesis

Roadmap Characterisations

Renewables: Marine Energy

UKERC Roadmaps

Roadmap Synthesis

Roadmap Characterisations

NUCLEAR FISSION and FUSION : Nuclear Fission

UKERC Roadmaps

Roadmap Synthesis

Roadmap Characterisations

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NUCLEAR FISSION and FUSION : Nuclear Fusion

Roadmap Characterisations

HYDROGEN and FUEL CELLS : Hydrogen

Roadmap Characterisations

General

Storage

HYDROGEN and FUEL CELLS : Fuel Cells

Roadmap Characterisations

OTHER POWER and STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES : Electricity transmission and distribution

Roadmap Characterisations

What is a roadmap?

The roadmaps are a collection of documents summarizing the proglems to be overcome before new technologies can be commercially viable, classified by IEA Energy Category

Many of the roadmaps are characterisations of recent enerty technology roadmaps relevent to the UK according to a number of criteria relating to structure, outputs and process. For each roadmap, key forward actions are identified.

 

roadmap structure

Each topic under the Roadmaps section of the Energy Research Atlas is broken into three parts.

The first part comprises original roadmaps prepared by UKERC. Draft versions of the roadmaps may be uploaded initially for wider comment.

The second part will contain syntheses of the existing roadmaps which will identify point of convergence, complementarities or conflicts between different roadmaps.

The third part characterises existing energy technology roadmaps relevant to the UK. Some have been developed in the UK, while others refer to other countries or are international in nature. The roadmaps are classified according to the IEA Energy R&D nomenclature. There may be several roadmaps covered for each IEA sector.

Ideally, Roadmaps should set out the sequence of research problems that need to be solved before new technologies can be deployed. Ideally, they should also be developed through a systematic process engaging all the relevant stakeholders. In practice, roadmaps are often more limited in terms of their ambition and the process followed.

Roadmaps are characterised according to a number of criteria relating to structure, outputs and process. The criteria relate to: the nature of the outputs (report, software); the roadmap architecture (timescales, trends, drivers, performance measures/targets); and the nature of the process engaged in (desk study, stakeholder consultation etc).

For each roadmap, key forward actions are identified, whether these relate to RD&D or wider policy aspects.