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UKERC response to the PRASEG Inquiry - Renewables and the Grid: Access and Management


Citation Baker. P., Chaudry. M., Mitchell. C, Woodman. B., Jenkins. N., Strbac. G. and Hardy. J UKERC response to the PRASEG Inquiry - Renewables and the Grid: Access and Management. 2010.
Author(s) Baker. P., Chaudry. M., Mitchell. C, Woodman. B., Jenkins. N., Strbac. G. and Hardy. J
Download UKERC_Response_to_the_PRASEG_Inquiry-Renewables_and_the_Grid-Access_and_Management.pdf document type
Abstract
  • Without the adoption of a more holistic approach that addresses BETTA structural reform and network regulation, it is difficult to see how a satisfactory resolution of the transmission access issue can be achieved.
  • It is proposed that more strategic and unified development of the onshore and offshore network together with the provision of interconnection would be encouraged through common or at least zonal ownership of offshore transmission assets, while cost-effectiveness and the efficient delivery of assets could be achieved through tendering and outsourcing construction.
  • Modern distribution networks are not typically designed to accommodate generation; a number of technical and operational challenges will need to be addressed in order for the connection of significant amounts of distributed generation on these networks.
  • The consequences of intermittency or variability of input will need to be managed by a combination of retaining conventional plant and developing demand response. Additionally, interconnection with adjacent transmission systems and improved forecasting of wind resource and maintaining geographic diversity of wind generation could also reduce the impacts of intermittency.
  • The role of “smart grids” will be to enhance the capacity and utilisation of the electricity grid (both transmission and distribution) by means other than investing in traditional transmission assets and, via the deployment of smart metering, massively increase the contribution of the demand side to system security and the decarbonisation of the heat and transport sectors.
  • UKERC is concerned that a major opportunity will be missed unless there is a timely change to a regulatory regime that encourages objective and costefficient choices between investment and smart grid solutions.