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Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, and direct air carbon capture and storage: Examining the evidence on deployment potential and costs in the UK


Citation Daggash, H.A., Fajardy, M., Heptonstall, P., MacDowell, N. and Gross, R. Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, and direct air carbon capture and storage: Examining the evidence on deployment potential and costs in the UK. UKERC. 2019.
Author(s) Daggash, H.A., Fajardy, M., Heptonstall, P., MacDowell, N. and Gross, R.
Publisher UKERC
Download Bioenergy_with_carbon_capture_and_storage_April_2019.pdf
UKERC Report Number N/A
Abstract

This UKERC TPA working paper has been prepared to support the Committee on Climate Change’s advice to the UK government on the implications of the Paris Agreement on its long-term emissions reduction targets. In their recent reports, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have highlighted that large-scale carbon dioxide removal (CDR), defined as any anthropogenic activity that results in the net removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, is critical to meeting the Paris Agreement target.

This review addresses two technological CDR solutions that have been demonstrated: bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and direct air carbon capture and storage (DACCS). The overarching questions which this review addresses, for both BECCS and DACCS, are:

  1. What is the potential contribution that these technologies could make to CO2 removal and potentially CO2emissions reductions to achieve net zero emissions in the UK?
  2. What are the current and projected costs, globally and in the UK, of these technologies and how plausible are projected cost reductions (including evidence for the benefits to be derived from economies of scale/technology learning)?