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Reference Number EP/E003192/1
Title Delivering sustainable water systems by optimising existing infrastructure via improved knowledge, understanding and technology - project NEPTUNE
Status Completed
Energy Categories ENERGY EFFICIENCY(Industry) 5%;
NOT ENERGY RELATED 95%;
Research Types Basic and strategic applied research 100%
Science and Technology Fields PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS (Computer Science and Informatics) 50%;
ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (Civil Engineering) 25%;
ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (Mechanical, Aeronautical and Manufacturing Engineering) 25%;
UKERC Cross Cutting Characterisation Not Cross-cutting 100%
Principal Investigator Professor NJD Graham
No email address given
Civil and Environmental Eng
Imperial College London
Award Type Standard
Funding Source EPSRC
Start Date 23 March 2007
End Date 22 September 2010
Duration 42 months
Total Grant Value £2,326,981
Industrial Sectors Water
Region London
Programme Energy Multidisciplinary Applications, Process Environment and Sustainability
 
Investigators Principal Investigator Professor NJD Graham , Civil and Environmental Eng, Imperial College London (99.986%)
  Other Investigator Professor D Butler , Engineering Computer Science and Maths, University of Exeter (0.001%)
Dr Z Kapelan , Engineering Computer Science and Maths, University of Exeter (0.001%)
Dr B Ulanicki , School of Engineering & Technology, De Montfort University (0.001%)
Dr SL Prescott , School of Engineering & Technology, De Montfort University (0.001%)
Dr R. A Fenner , Engineering, University of Cambridge (0.001%)
Dr K Soga , Engineering, University of Cambridge (0.001%)
Dr E Prempain , Department of Engineering, University of Leicester (0.001%)
Professor A J Saul , Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield (0.001%)
Professor RM (Richard ) Ashley , Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield (0.001%)
Dr J Boxall , Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield (0.001%)
Professor IW Marshall , Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University (0.001%)
Professor I Postlethwaite , School of Computing, Engineering & Information Sciences, Northumbria University (0.001%)
Dr S Khu , Civil, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Surrey (0.001%)
Professor D Savic , Wastewater and Reuse, KWR Watercycle Research Institute (0.001%)
  Recognised Researcher Dr C Makropoulos , Engineering Computer Science and Maths, University of Exeter (0.000%)
Professor C Maksimovic , Imperial College London (0.000%)
Web Site
Objectives
Abstract Water service providers (WSPs) have obligations to supply drinking water to all consumers that meets increasingly stringent water quality regulations and minimum flow and pressure criteria. At the same time, WSPs are required to be ever more efficient to demonstrate value, moves to sustainable operation and also to be more profitable (even where the supplies are publicly provided). Worldwide, not only in the UK, suppliers of water increasingly have to meet a widening range of performance criteria that are expected to improve year-on-year. Other pressures include the growing costs and availability of energy needed to deliver water, especially through pumping, the increasing uncertainty caused by climate change and the drive to minimise water losses from supply networks. Traditionally the supply of water via networks, to the tap, has been provided by large scale engineering and low-risk, low-technology systems. These rely heavily on energy use for pumping etc. and often operate inefficiently, with more pumping than is needed and excessive pressures in networks, leading to higher than necessary levels of leakage. NEPTUNE intends, by advancing knowledge and understanding and introducing new IT and technological systems, to provide the means whereby water service providers in the UK (and elsewhere, where the systems are similar), can better integrate the operation of their supply systems, to more efficiently manage security at the tap, minimise leakage and the redundant andunnecessary transfer of water or storage, hence saving resources, especially costs and energy
Publications (none)
Final Report (none)
Added to Database 01/01/07