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Reference Number EP/P016146/1
Title Development of a new generation of high efficiency heat pumps using pre-heated air supply
Status Completed
Energy Categories ENERGY EFFICIENCY(Other) 50%;
RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES(Solar Energy, Solar heating and cooling (including daylighting)) 50%;
Research Types Basic and strategic applied research 100%
Science and Technology Fields ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (General Engineering and Mineral & Mining Engineering) 50%;
ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (Architecture and the Built Environment) 50%;
UKERC Cross Cutting Characterisation Not Cross-cutting 60%;
Systems Analysis related to energy R&D (Other Systems Analysis) 30%;
Sociological economical and environmental impact of energy (Other sociological economical and environmental impact of energy) 10%;
Principal Investigator Professor GG (Graeme ) Maidment
No email address given
Faculty of Engineering, Science and the Built Environment
London South Bank University
Award Type Standard
Funding Source EPSRC
Start Date 01 October 2016
End Date 30 September 2017
Duration 12 months
Total Grant Value £61,254
Industrial Sectors Energy
Region London
Programme Energy : Energy
 
Investigators Principal Investigator Professor GG (Graeme ) Maidment , Faculty of Engineering, Science and the Built Environment, London South Bank University (99.999%)
  Other Investigator Dr A Paurine , Sch of Built Environment & Architectur, London South Bank University (0.001%)
Web Site
Objectives
Abstract This project is a feasibility study into the proposal of using solar collectors which when integrated into buildings can prewarm the air fed into ASHP (Air Source Heat Pumps)Pre-feasibility modelling indicates that by using solar air collectors to pre-heat the air supply to specially optimised ASHPswe will be able to increase the efficiency of ASHPs to the extent that 1) the carbon emissions (per kWh of heat) from theiruse will be significantly lower than the emissions associated with energy efficient gas boilers and 2) the cost of heat will(within the 2020s) become lower than that from efficient gas boilers.The findings could therefore lead to a step-change in the competitiveness of ASHPs relative to gas boilers. This willaccelerate the mainstream deployment of ASHPs in the UK, initially within new build housing and new commercialbuildings and subsequently into the existing UK building stock.The project will specifically investigate:Appraisal of system design optionsDevelopment of a detailed thermodynamic system design model and demand-side model(s),Formulation of control and modulation strategiesInvestigation into optimisation of system components (with particular attention to working fluids, fluid flow rates, heatexchanger and controller)Calculation of theoretical system performance in different climates and undertaking of cost benefit and benchmarkinganalysis.This project will contribute towards addressing the UK's energy trilemma by reducing emissions by leading to a supply ofrenewable heat with lower carbon emissions than mains gas and of renewable cooling with significantly lower emissionsthan electricity powered compressor-based cooling systems; improving security of supply by significantly reducing demandfor fossil fuels; and reducing cost by providing a high-efficiency ASHP capable of generating heat (for space heating, waterheating and cooling) at a lower cost than both mains gas and other renewable energy/"clean energy" options.This project is a feasibility study into the proposal of using solar collectors which when integrated into buildings can prewarm the air fed into ASHP (Air Source Heat Pumps)Pre-feasibility modelling indicates that by using solar air collectors to pre-heat the air supply to specially optimised ASHPswe will be able to increase the efficiency of ASHPs to the extent that 1) the carbon emissions (per kWh of heat) from theiruse will be significantly lower than the emissions associated with energy efficient gas boilers and 2) the cost of heat will(within the 2020s) become lower than that from efficient gas boilers.The findings could therefore lead to a step-change in the competitiveness of ASHPs relative to gas boilers. This willaccelerate the mainstream deployment of ASHPs in the UK, initially within new build housing and new commercialbuildings and subsequently into the existing UK building stock.The project will specifically investigate:Appraisal of system design optionsDevelopment of a detailed thermodynamic system design model and demand-side model(s),Formulation of control and modulation strategiesInvestigation into optimisation of system components (with particular attention to working fluids, fluid flow rates, heatexchanger and controller)Calculation of theoretical system performance in different climates and undertaking of cost benefit and benchmarkinganalysis.This project will contribute towards addressing the UK's energy trilemma by reducing emissions by leading to a supply ofrenewable heat with lower carbon emissions than mains gas and of renewable cooling with significantly lower emissionsthan electricity powered compressor-based cooling systems; improving security of supply by significantly reducing demandfor fossil fuels; and reducing cost by providing a high-efficiency ASHP capable of generating heat (for space heating, waterheating and cooling) at a lower cost than both mains gas and other renewable energy/"clean energy" options.
Publications (none)
Final Report (none)
Added to Database 23/12/16