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Reference Number EP/K03099X/1
Title EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Large Area Electronics
Status Completed
Energy Categories ENERGY EFFICIENCY(Industry) 50%;
NOT ENERGY RELATED 50%;
Research Types Basic and strategic applied research 100%
Science and Technology Fields PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS (Physics) 25%;
PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS (Metallurgy and Materials) 25%;
ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (Mechanical, Aeronautical and Manufacturing Engineering) 50%;
UKERC Cross Cutting Characterisation Not Cross-cutting 100%
Principal Investigator Mr C Rider
No email address given
UNLISTED
Cambridge Photon Technology
Award Type Standard
Funding Source EPSRC
Start Date 01 October 2013
End Date 28 June 2019
Duration 69 months
Total Grant Value £5,597,150
Industrial Sectors Electronics; Manufacturing
Region East of England
Programme Manufacturing : Manufacturing
 
Investigators Principal Investigator Mr C Rider , UNLISTED, Cambridge Photon Technology (99.985%)
  Other Investigator Dr DJ Curtis , Engineering, Swansea University (0.001%)
Professor TC Claypole , Engineering, Swansea University (0.001%)
Professor PR Williams , Engineering, Swansea University (0.001%)
Professor DT Gethin , Engineering, Swansea University (0.001%)
Professor KC Persaud , Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, University of Manchester (0.001%)
Professor A Nathan , Engineering, University of Cambridge (0.001%)
Dr AJ Flewitt , Engineering, University of Cambridge (0.001%)
Professor H Sirringhaus , Physics, University of Cambridge (0.001%)
Dr T (Thomas ) Anthopoulos , Department of Physics (the Blackett Laboratory), Imperial College London (0.001%)
Professor D C (Donal ) Bradley , Department of Physics (the Blackett Laboratory), Imperial College London (0.001%)
Dr P Stavrinou , Department of Physics (the Blackett Laboratory), Imperial College London (0.001%)
Dr N (Natalie ) Stingelin-Stutzmann , Materials, Imperial College London (0.001%)
Professor ML Turner , Chemistry, University of Manchester (0.001%)
Professor SG Yeates , Chemistry, University of Manchester (0.001%)
Professor A Holmes , Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London (0.001%)
  Industrial Collaborator Project Contact , National Physical Laboratory (NPL) (0.000%)
Project Contact , Oxford Lasers Ltd (0.000%)
Project Contact , DSTL - Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (0.000%)
Project Contact , Cambridge Display Technology Ltd (0.000%)
Project Contact , Solvay S.A., Belgium (0.000%)
Project Contact , Merck Sharpe And Dohme (0.000%)
Project Contact , Merck and Co Inc, USA (0.000%)
Project Contact , Nokia Research Centre (0.000%)
Project Contact , CPI Ltd (0.000%)
Project Contact , SABMiller plc (0.000%)
Project Contact , Molecular Vision (0.000%)
Project Contact , De La Rue International Ltd (0.000%)
Project Contact , Dow Corning Ltd (0.000%)
Project Contact , Eight19 Ltd (0.000%)
Project Contact , PragmatIC Printing Ltd (0.000%)
Project Contact , Plastic Logic Ltd (0.000%)
Project Contact , RK Print Coat Instruments Ltd (0.000%)
Project Contact , SPECIFIC Innovation and Knowledge Centre (0.000%)
Project Contact , 3M United Kingdom PLC (0.000%)
Web Site
Objectives
Abstract Large-Area Electronics is a branch of electronics in which functionality is distributed over large-areas, much bigger than the dimensions of a typical circuit board. Recently, it has become possible to manufacture electronic devices and circuits using a solution-based approach in which a "palette" of functional "inks" is printed on flexible webs to create the multi-layered patterns required to build up devices. This approach is very different from the fabrication and assembly of conventional silicon-based electronics and offers the benefits of lower-cost manufacturing plants that can operate with reduced waste and power consumption, producing electronic systems in high volume with new form factors and features. Examples of "printed devices" include new kinds of photovoltaics, lighting, displays, sensing systems and intelligent objects. We use the term "large-area electronics" (LAE) rather than "printable electronics" because many electronic systems require both conventional and printed electronics, benefitting from the high performance of the conventional and the ability of the printable to create functionality over large-areas cost-effectively. Great progress has been made over the last 20 years in producing new printable functional materials with suitable performance and stability in operation but despite this promise, the emerging industry has been slow to take-off, due in part to (i) manufacturing scale-up being significantly more challenging than expected and (ii) the current inability to produce complete multifunctional electronic systems as required in several early markets, such as brand enhancement and intelligent packaging. Our proposed Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Large-Area Electronics will tackle these challenges to support the emergence of a vibrant UK manufacturing industry in the sector. Our vision has four key elements:- to address the technical challenges of low-cost manufacturing of multi-functional LAE systems- to develop a long-term research programme in advanced manufacturing processes aimed at ongoing reduction in manufacturing cost and improvement in system performance.- to support the scale-up of technologies and processes developed in and with the Centre by UK manufacturing industry- to promote the adoption of LAE technologies by the wider UK electronics manufacturing industryOur Centre for Innovative Manufacturing brings together 4 UK academic Centres of Excellence in LAE at the University of Cambridge (Cambridge Integrated Knowledge Centre, CIKC), Imperial College London (Centre for Plastic Electronics, CPE), Swansea University (Welsh Centre for Printing and Coating, WCPC) and the University of Manchester (Organic Materials Innovation Centre, OMIC) to create a truly representative national centre with world-class expertise in design, development, fabrication and characterisation of a wide range of devices, materials and processes
Publications (none)
Final Report (none)
Added to Database 13/03/13