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Reference Number EP/E029051/1
Title Advanced modelling and operation of multiple voltage source inverters for distributed generation
Status Completed
Energy Categories OTHER POWER and STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES(Electric power conversion) 25%;
OTHER POWER and STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES(Electricity transmission and distribution) 75%;
Research Types Basic and strategic applied research 100%
Science and Technology Fields ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) 100%
UKERC Cross Cutting Characterisation Not Cross-cutting 100%
Principal Investigator Professor T Green
No email address given
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Imperial College London
Award Type Standard
Funding Source EPSRC
Start Date 01 October 2007
End Date 30 September 2010
Duration 36 months
Total Grant Value £202,024
Industrial Sectors Energy
Region London
Programme Energy : Engineering
 
Investigators Principal Investigator Professor T Green , Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London (100.000%)
Web Site
Objectives
Abstract Most forms of new and renewable energy produce power in DC form or as AC at an inconvenient frequency. To inject this energy into the electricity network requires a power converter known as an inverter. As the proportion of energy from such sources rises, the inverters will be expect to take a role in controlling the network beyond just supply energy. This research proposal addresses two aspects of the system that must be modelled and understood before the control design can be concluded: thedetailed dynamic behaviour of the inverters when subjected to sudden changes such as large load changes will be modelled and the role the proprieties of the data communications (such as latency and bandwidth) play in shaping the control properties of remotely controlled distributed resources will be studied. Once this analysis has been verified against experimental observation, the research will tackle an example application of controlling inverters within a power system under the umbrella ofthe emerging concept of "active distribution networks". The control aspects of forming self-sufficient power "islands" out of fractions of the grid will be developed as a means to continue supplying local customers from local generators when the national system experiences a failure
Publications (none)
Final Report (none)
Added to Database 01/01/07