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Reference Number BB/G01616X/1
Title BBSRC Centre For Sustainable Bioenergy (BSBEC): Programme 4: Lignocellulosic Conversion To Bioethanol (LACE)
Status Completed
Energy Categories RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES(Bio-Energy, Production of transport biofuels (incl. Production from wastes)) 50%;
RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES(Bio-Energy, Applications for heat and electricity) 50%;
Research Types Basic and strategic applied research 100%
Science and Technology Fields SOCIAL SCIENCES (Sociology) 20%;
BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES (Biological Sciences) 40%;
PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS (Chemistry) 20%;
ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (Mechanical, Aeronautical and Manufacturing Engineering) 20%;
UKERC Cross Cutting Characterisation Sociological economical and environmental impact of energy (Environmental dimensions) 33%;
Sociological economical and environmental impact of energy (Other sociological economical and environmental impact of energy) 67%;
Principal Investigator Prof G (Greg ) Tucker
No email address given
Biosciences
University of Nottingham
Award Type Research Grant
Funding Source BBSRC
Start Date 01 May 2009
End Date 30 November 2014
Duration 67 months
Total Grant Value £5,349,451
Industrial Sectors Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology
Region East Midlands
Programme Bioenergy Initiative (BEN)
 
Investigators Principal Investigator Prof G (Greg ) Tucker , Biosciences, University of Nottingham (99.981%)
  Other Investigator Professor GP Hammond , Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath (0.001%)
Dr MC McManus , Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath (0.001%)
Dr J (John ) Andresen , School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University (0.001%)
Dr S Raman , Sociology and Social Policy, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Professor R (Robert ) Dingwall , School of Social Sciences, Nottingham Trent University (0.001%)
Dr S.J. (Stephen ) Ramsden , Biosciences, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Prof P (Phil ) Garnsworthy , Biosciences, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Dr D (David ) Cook , Biosciences, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Dr S (Sean ) May , Biosciences, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Prof S (Sandra ) Hill , Biosciences, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Dr K (Kate ) Millar , Biosciences, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Dr T (Tim ) Foster , Biosciences, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Prof I (Ian ) Connerton , Biosciences, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Dr P (Paul ) Wilson , Biosciences, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Dr R (Rob ) Linforth , Biosciences, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Prof D (David ) Archer , School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Professor S (Sam ) Kingman , Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham (0.001%)
Prof E (Ed ) Louis , Department of Genetics, University of Leicester (0.001%)
Prof K (Katherine ) Smart , SABMiller plc (0.001%)
Web Site
Objectives Objectives not supplied
Abstract The conversion of plant materials to fuels such as ethanol, butanol and biodiesels is a multi-step process sometimes referred to as a biorefinery. The key steps in the biorefinery are collection of the crop (which may be specifically grown as an energy crop, or be agricultural waste material), pre-treatment to make the lignocellulose more accessible, conversion of the sugars to a fuel molecule, and extraction of the fuel. There are several key challenges which need to be addressed to achieve sustainable conversion of lignocellulosic materials to fuels including: the accessibility and extraction of sugars using enzyme toolkits that can be applied to multiple plant biomass streams; the generation of fermentation substrates that are 'fit for purpose' for fermentation with low inhibitors and appropriate viscosity but are sustainable; the development of strains that can utilise the sugars liberated and efficiently convert them to fuels (in this case ethanol); the optimisation of fermentation to achieve a sustainable conversion. We will use a multi-disciplinary approach to address each of these key challenges. It is now widely recognised that biomass resources can be converted to produce so-called 'biofuels', 'bioheat' and 'bioelectricity' that have potential environmental benefits and greenhouse gas (GHG) savings. However, they also have possible side-effects in terms of emissions due to indirect land-use changes, loss of biodiversity, and competition with food production. Sustainability assessments are consequently required in order to ensure that net benefits flow from the utilisation of bioenergy resources. We will therefore also evaluate the sustainability of various bioenergy routes we propose to develop by applying the 'Three Pillars' of sustainable development: balancing of economic and social development with environmental protection.
Publications (none)
Final Report (none)
Added to Database 30/09/13