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Reference Number InnUK/102075/01
Title Influence of creep and geometry on strength of irradiated graphite components
Status Completed
Energy Categories NUCLEAR FISSION and FUSION(Nuclear Fission, Nuclear supporting technologies) 100%;
Research Types Applied Research and Development 100%
Science and Technology Fields PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS (Metallurgy and Materials) 100%
UKERC Cross Cutting Characterisation Not Cross-cutting 100%
Principal Investigator Project Contact
No email address given
EDF Energy Nuclear Generation Limited
Award Type Collaborative Research & Development
Funding Source Innovate-UK
Start Date 01 June 2015
End Date 30 June 2017
Duration 25 months
Total Grant Value £706,708
Industrial Sectors
Region South West
Programme Competition Call: 1403_CRD2_ENE_GEN_DCNS - Developing the civil nuclear supply chain CRD. Activity Developing the civil nuclear supply chain ( CR&D)
 
Investigators Principal Investigator Project Contact , EDF Energy Nuclear Generation Limited (29.117%)
  Other Investigator Project Contact , University of Manchester (66.410%)
Project Contact , National Nuclear Laboratory Limited (4.473%)
Web Site
Objectives
Abstract The proposed work aims to improve the understanding of graphite fracture and irradiation creep behaviour by studying large specimens extracted from a reactor at end-of-service. This uniquely will enable valid fracture and creep data to be determined on material that had seen reactor conditions to high dose and weight loss conditions. Current data are determined on small specimens that are either unirradiated or irradiated in materials test reactors. In particular, the likely life-limiting failure mode is through a process known as keyway root cracking. Here a crack initiates at a sharp re-entrant corner; to study this failure mode in particular requires specimens of sufficient size to give a valid range of notch geometries. In addition, the relaxation of stress by irradiation creep is a key process to mitigate processes at sharp corners. No work on irradiation creep has been performed on corner geometries or at high tensile strain; both of these will be addressed in the current proposal. The results will allow the continued safe operation of reactors, enabling low carbon energy to be produced in the UK.The proposed work aims to improve the understanding of graphite fracture and irradiation creep behaviour by studying large specimens extracted from a reactor at end-of-service. This uniquely will enable valid fracture and creep data to be determined on material that had seen reactor conditions to high dose and weight loss conditions. Current data are determined on small specimens that are either unirradiated or irradiated in materials test reactors. In particular, the likely life-limiting failure mode is through a process known as keyway root cracking. Here a crack initiates at a sharp re-entrant corner; to study this failure mode in particular requires specimens of sufficient size to give a valid range of notch geometries. In addition, the relaxation of stress by irradiation creep is a key process to mitigate processes at sharp corners. No work on irradiation creep has been performed on corner geometries or at high tensile strain; both of these will be addressed in the current proposal. The results will allow the continued safe operation of reactors, enabling low carbon energy to be produced in the UK.The proposed work aims to improve the understanding of graphite fracture and irradiation creep behaviour by studying large specimens extracted from a reactor at end-of-service. This uniquely will enable valid fracture and creep data to be determined on material that had seen reactor conditions to high dose and weight loss conditions. Current data are determined on small specimens that are either unirradiated or irradiated in materials test reactors. In particular, the likely life-limiting failure mode is through a process known as keyway root cracking. Here a crack initiates at a sharp re-entrant corner; to study this failure mode in particular requires specimens of sufficient size to give a valid range of notch geometries. In addition, the relaxation of stress by irradiation creep is a key process to mitigate processes at sharp corners. No work on irradiation creep has been performed on corner geometries or at high tensile strain; both of these will be addressed in the current proposal. The results will allow the continued safe operation of reactors, enabling low carbon energy to be produced in the UK.
Publications (none)
Final Report (none)
Added to Database 06/12/17