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Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D1.3. Market Design and System Integration (summary report)


Citation Greenleaf, J. and Rix, O. Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D1.3. Market Design and System Integration (summary report), ETI, 2017. https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000926.
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Author(s) Greenleaf, J. and Rix, O.
Project partner(s) Baringa, Element Energy Ltd, TRL Ltd
Publisher ETI
DOI https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000926
Download AdHoc_ESD_TR1006_3.pdf document type
Abstract The objective of the Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration project is to inform UK Government and European policy and to help shape energy and automotive industry products, propositions and investment strategies. Additionally, it aims to develop an integrated set of analytical tools that models future market scenarios in order to test the impact of future policy, industry and societal choices. The project is made up of two stages:
  • Stage 1 aims to characterize market and policy frameworks, business propositions, and the integrated vehicle and energy infrastructure system and technologies best suited to enabling a cost-effective UK energy system for low-carbon vehicles, using the amalgamated analytical toolset.
  • Stage 2 aims to fill knowledge gaps and validate assumptions from Stage 1 through scientifically robust research, including real world trials with private vehicle consumers and case studies with business fleets. A mainstream consumer uptake trial will be carried out to measure attitudes to PiVs after direct experience of them, and consumer charging trials will measure mainstream consumer PiV charging behaviours and responses to managed harging options
This report represents Deliverable D1.3, Market Design and System Integration. The purpose of this report is to illustrate structures that can facilitate efficient, mass-market, deployment and use of Ultra-Low Emission Vehicles (ULEV) and their integration into the energy system and to help inform the high level design parameters of the trial to be conducted in Stage 2 of the project. This document should be read in conjunction with the D4.2 Final Analysis of Technology, Commercial and Market Building Blocks for Energy Infrastructure Report, from WP4 as the information in D4.2 has been used to inform the scope of analysis conducted in WP1a. From the review of evidence to date it was clear that there had been limited work undertaken to explore how mass-market roll-out and use of ULEVs could be facilitated when considering a more holistic assessment across the four key dimensions of the:
  • Customer Proposition.
  • Physical Supply Chain.
  • Commercial Value Chain.
  • Market and Policy Framework.
The analysis has been used to identify potential elements of a ‘good’ solution and to set these out on a roadmap. The roadmap gives broad timing guidelines both for when Government intervention is required and when key industry participants should act.

The individual elements of a ‘good’ solution have been categorised as follows:
  • Essential – these actions have been clearly identified as good, and found tobe robust to different circumstances explored through the Sensitivity analysis. They are considered to be no or low regret actions.
  • Desirable – actions for which a strong case exists and which are likely to have a positive impact under most circumstances. However, a failure to employ these actions is unlikely, by itself, to lead to a failure to achieve mass uptake and use of ULEVs. Additional evidence or reduced uncertainty may also be desired by individual actors before a decision to implement them.
  • Provisional – an additional categorisation implying actions for which a positive case may exist, but for which the extent or timing of deployment is likely to depend on reduction of uncertainty in the basis of analysis. This may occur through the passing of time and, for example, realisation of outturn costs. It may alternatively occur through obtainment of additional or expanded evidence from trials or initial pilot scale deployment.
This report discusses the essential, desirable and provisional elements, along with a number of elements that are deemed to be ineffective or unnecessary in reaching a ‘good’ solution. The risks and barriers associated with the key elements of a ‘good’ solution were assessed qualitatively and taken into account in constructing the roadmap. Whilst the roadmap is forward looking, it does take today’s market and policy landscape as a starting point. Existing policies have primarily centred on reducing the upfront cost of ULEVs through the provisionof grants (Plug-in Car, Van, Motorcycle Grants), incentivising the installation of charging points, for example with match funding through the Plugged in Places scheme, and funding a range of innovative projects to support uptake in cities via the Go Ultra Low Cities scheme.

The implications for Stage 2 mainly concern the Customer Proposition - what will help drive ULEV uptake and use from the perspective of mainstream consumers, rather than ULEV innovators.

The elements that it would be useful to understand further through the trial are grouped into:
  • To what extent users engage and how they respond to new electricity charging tariffs and what this means for charging behaviour, e.g.via some load shifting in response to ToU tariffs as part of User-Managed Charging, or more optimal load shifting through Supplier-Managed Charging.
  • Indirect factors affecting the decision to purchase a ULEV over a conventional vehicle,such as uncertainty over the variability of costs of electricity charging at non-home locations, and other ‘components’ that were identified in the four keyareas but not quantified in Stage 1.
  • An overarching lack of understanding about the conditions required to enable a shift towards mobility as a service (e.g. what level of financial compensation might be required for any perceived loss of convenience, status and how this varies across different consumer groups.)
Associated Project(s) ETI-TR1006: Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI)
Associated Dataset(s) No associated datasets
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