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Enabling Technologies - Identifying a short-list of technologies for potential engagement by the ETI - Final Report (Task 3 Step 1)


Citation Hitachi, EDF Energy, Imperial College London, Element Energy Enabling Technologies - Identifying a short-list of technologies for potential engagement by the ETI - Final Report (Task 3 Step 1), ETI, 2013. https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000692.
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Author(s) Hitachi, EDF Energy, Imperial College London, Element Energy
Project partner(s) Hitachi Eupope Ltd, EDF Energy, Imperial College London, Element Energy Ltd
Publisher ETI
DOI https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000692
Download SSH_SS1101_3.pdf document type
Associated Project(s) ETI-SS1101: Smart Systems and Heat (SSH) Programme - Enabling Component Technologies
Associated Dataset(s) No associated datasets
Abstract This project identified gaps in the range of potential smart systems technologies to accelerate the development of component technologies which are required for any successful deployment and operation of a future smart energy system. This £500k project was announced in February 2013 and was delivered by a consortium of partners that includes Hitachi Europe, EDF Energy, Element Energy, David Vincent & Associates and Imperial Consultants.

The key objective was to identify a short-list of technology development opportunities for specific technologies which are likely to have a role in smart heating systems that, under certain scenarios, have the potential to make a significant contribution to reducing national carbon emissions.
  • Community scale biomass / biogas CHP
  • LV Voltage control technologies
  • Energy Management Services and advanced network controls systems.
To provide a comprehensive assessment of the issues associated with implementing new, low carbon heating systems, it is also necessary to consider the impact of technology selection on the wider energy system and the influence that the nature of the local area might have on technology choice.

Technical considerations would need to include, in addition to technology specific factors, systems design (where “system” includes building fabric, controls, management, storage, heat generator, heat emitters, etc.), optimisation and packaging. Non-technical factors would also need to be considered including: supply chain coordination, installer competency, sale/lease and energy services models, finance packages and system (as oppose to product) efficacy guarantees, etc. In addition to the technologies identified above, assessment of the short-listedtechnologies on the basis of the proposed criteria also highlights
  • hybrid ASHP,
  • High Density Thermal Storage (HDTS) and
  • HEMS / HAN as high priority technologies.
To provide a framework for this analysis, the Consortium has developed the concept of Host Space Environments (HSEs), which are archetypes of local areas, typical in terms of mix and density of buildings, to real towns, cities and rural settlements. The six HSEs have been constructed from general principles and publicly available datato be representative of over 75% of the national housing stock. The house types in each HSE are also representative of the stock which we would expect tofind in specific locations.

The report was initially published in July 2013.