UKERC Energy Data Centre: ETI Publications

UKERC Home >> EDC Home >> ETI Publications >> Back to Results >> Data Management and System Architecture - SSH International ICT Initiatives Report, Review of UK/EU ICT Directives (WA3 WP1a D3.1)

Data Management and System Architecture - SSH International ICT Initiatives Report, Review of UK/EU ICT Directives (WA3 WP1a D3.1)


Citation DNV KEMA Energy & Sustainability Data Management and System Architecture - SSH International ICT Initiatives Report, Review of UK/EU ICT Directives (WA3 WP1a D3.1), ETI, 2013. https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000490.
Cite this using DataCite
Author(s) DNV KEMA Energy & Sustainability
Project partner(s) DNV KEMA Ltd
Publisher ETI
DOI https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000490
Download SSH_SS1301_8.pdf document type
Associated Project(s) ETI-SS1301: Smart Systems and Heat (SSH) Programme - Data Management and Overall System Architecture
Associated Dataset(s) No associated datasets
Abstract This project specified the data system functionality and architecture that would fulfil the information and service requirements of a smart energy system. This included data security and privacy aspects. Hitachi Europe and energy & sustainability consultants DNV Kema worked independently on two £100,000 contracts to identify any data system constraints that need to be incorporated into smart energy systems. The projects were launched in February 2013. The envisaged ETI Smart Systems and Heat system will depend on Information and Communications Technology (ICT) for its efficient design, operation and management. The ICT system will need to provide functionality right along the energy delivery chain: from supply to the end consumer. It will also need to support commercial activities such as billing, and to support academic analysis and review of the system during trials and proving.

he principal objective achieved within the reports is the identification from other relevant projects of architectural techniques that can be applied to the SSH data architecture design and to identify and assess UK and EU directives, protocols, and legislative initiatives that may impact upon delivery of the SSH Programme

High-level conclusions that can be drawn from this work are as follows:
  1. Interoperability is a vital prerequisite for a successful trial and a workable, enduring smart energy system;
  2. New system control techniques will be essential for performing groundbreaking functions in a dynamic, bi-directional energy environment;
  3. Due regard should be paid towhat data needs to be transferred from within, and between, the various tiers of the smart energy system, and what security should be in place to ensure that critical national infrastructure and customer information is appropriately protected.
Throughout the analysis, it was found that few projects cover the integration of both electricity and heat, clearly highlighting the uniqueness of the SSH programme. Furthermore, cyber security has more often than notbeen placed into the „too difficult to do? box. However,given the country-wide focus of the SSH programme this issue will need to be tackled.