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Data Management and System Architecture - Technology Landscape and Outline Functional Specification. WA3 WP1 D3.1 Report on International Initiatives


Citation Hitachi Europe Ltd Data Management and System Architecture - Technology Landscape and Outline Functional Specification. WA3 WP1 D3.1 Report on International Initiatives, ETI, 2013. https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000491.
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Author(s) Hitachi Europe Ltd
Project partner(s) Hitachi Europe Ltd, Brunel University, University of Oxford, Gemalto
Publisher ETI
DOI https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000491
Download SSH_SS1301_9.pdf document type
Associated Project(s) ETI-SS1301: Smart Systems and Heat (SSH) Programme - Data Management and Overall System Architecture
Associated Dataset(s) No associated datasets
Abstract This project specified the data system functionality and architecture that would fulfil the information and service requirements of a smart energy system. This included data security and privacy aspects. Hitachi Europe and energy & sustainability consultants DNV Kema worked independently on two £100,000 contracts to identify any data system constraints that need to be incorporated into smart energy systems. The projects were launched in February 2013. The envisaged ETI Smart Systems and Heat system will depend on Information and Communications Technology (ICT) for its efficient design, operation and management. The ICT system will need to provide functionality right along the energy delivery chain: from supply to the end consumer. It will also need to support commercial activities such as billing, and to support academic analysis and review of the system during trials and proving.

The envisaged ETI Smart Systems and Heat system will depend on Information and Communications Technology (ICT) for its efficient design, operation and management. The ICT system will need to provide functionality right along the energy delivery chain: from supply to the end consumer. It will also need to support commercial activities such as billing, and to support academic analysis and review of the system during trials and proving. The purpose of Work Area 3 (WA3) is to specify a data architecture that fulfils the information and service requirements of the smart energy system (including data security and privacy).

The principal objective achieved within the reports is the identification from other relevant projects of architectural techniques that can be applied to the SSH data architecture design and to identify and assess UK and EU directives, protocols,and legislative initiativesthat may impact upon delivery of the SSH Programme

A formal analysis methodology based on defined Research Questions is used as the basis of analysis. This methodology permits the analysis of initiatives against defined quality aspects and is based on software engineering best practice. Each initiative is analysed to determine how the designers sought to achieve a specified quality aspect (such as performance or reliability) using known design techniques.From an initial extensive list of initiatives the following are identified as directly relevant to the SSHP:
  • HiPerDNO
  • OpenNode
  • NIST IR 7628 Smart Grid Cyber Security
  • Prototype Island Smart Grid
  • Autonomous Decentralised Transport Operation Control System
  • Traffic Management System for Kyushu Shinkansen train
  • Danish Cell Controller Pilot Project
  • M/490 Smart Grid Information Security working group
  • EU-Commission Smart Grid Task Force (SGTF)
Together, the design aspects and tactics employed in these initiatives provide a basis for the design of the data management architecture for the SSHP.

This deliverable presents several architecture patterns for the defined quality aspects. Though each pattern has its own characteristics, a pattern found here, generally speaking, represents its own approach to decomposition of an ICT system. Security centric architecture, for example, requires the decomposition of a system according to the asset importance. Strictly confidential data must be separated from other data and should be protected by an elaborate security scheme such as defence-in-depth strategy found in the project we studied. On the other hand, the performance requirement may demand the confidential data should be stored with some other data to guarantee quick data merging. Or, adaptability may, for example, require data separation so that a change of tregulation should cause only a simple exchange of corresponding components. In this way quality aspects, or criteria of decomposition, sometimes collapse and bring design discrepancies.

One of the challenges facing UK power networks is dealing with power instability in the distribution network caused by the increase of RE and increase of variation and number of demand devices in the future. Thus, in future work, we will focus on control of power and devices in distribution networks as challenges in SSHP