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WP3 Case Study Development Hybrid Heat Pumps: Energy Systems Architecture Methodology - Enabling Multi-vector Market Design


Citation Energy Systems Catapult WP3 Case Study Development Hybrid Heat Pumps: Energy Systems Architecture Methodology - Enabling Multi-vector Market Design, ETI, 2017. https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000578.
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Author(s) Energy Systems Catapult
Project partner(s) Energy Systems Catapult
Publisher ETI
DOI https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000578
Download AdHoc_SSH_SS9011_2.pdf document type
Associated Project(s) ETI-SS1001: Smart Systems and Heat (SSH) Programme - Data Management and System Architecture Review
Associated Dataset(s) No associated datasets
Abstract The Case Study Development project was commissioned by the ETI in Nov 2015 as part of Work Package 3 (WP3) of the Smart Systems and Heat Phase 1 programme. The project was intended to develop Market, Business and ICT Integrated Solutions through system architectures to provide evidence and guidance for business strategy and policy to enable the UK low carbon heat transition. This was achieved through understanding the inter-relationships between market frameworks, business process, asset management and ICT solutions. Primary focus was on the implementation at the local level, but in the context of a national energy system transition.

This report has been prepared by the ESC from the third part of SSH, as a set of conceptual tools to develop and analyse system architectures. Whether there is ever a single “System Architect” or not, it is important that the design of complex and mission critical systems on which society depends are developed through a robust set of engineering processes that ensure they are fit for purpose. At the highest level this is about affordability, security and sustainability. Equitable access has dimensions that stretch well beyond technical and economic factors but the system should be designed so that equitable access is made easier and not harder; the system design should provide levers that public policy can use to deliver policy objectives.