UKERC Energy Data Centre: ETI Publications

UKERC Home >> EDC Home >> ETI Publications >> Back to Results >> Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D1.1. Summary of approach, conceptual design and key research questions

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D1.1. Summary of approach, conceptual design and key research questions


Citation Greenleaf, J. and Rix, O. Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D1.1. Summary of approach, conceptual design and key research questions, ETI, 2016. https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000916.
Cite this using DataCite
Author(s) Greenleaf, J. and Rix, O.
Project partner(s) Baringa, Element Energy Ltd, TRL Ltd
Publisher ETI
DOI https://doi.org/10.5286/UKERC.EDC.000916
Download AdHoc_ESD_TR1006_1.pdf document type
Abstract The objective of the Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration project is to inform UK Government and European policy and to help shape energy and automotive industry products, propositions and investment strategies. Additionally, it aims to develop an integrated set of analytical tools that models future market scenarios in order to test the impact of future policy, industry and societal choices. The project is made up of two stages:
  • Stage 1 aims to characterize market and policy frameworks, business propositions, and the integrated vehicle and energy infrastructure system and technologies best suited to enabling a cost-effective UK energy system for low-carbon vehicles, using the amalgamated analytical toolset.
  •  Stage 2 aims to fill knowledge gaps and validate assumptions from Stage 1 through scientifically robust research, including real world trials with privatevehicle consumers and case studies with business fleets. A mainstream consumer uptake trial will be carried out to measure attitudes to PiVs after direct experience of them, and consumer charging trials will measure mainstream consumer PiV charging behaviours and responses to managed harging options
This report represents Deliverable D1.1, Summary of Approach, Conceptual Design and Key Research Questions. The purpose of this report is to set out the analytical approach being taken to the identification and assessment of system options, and the tool set being used. This report should be read in conjunction with report D4.1, “Initial Analysis of Technology, Commercial and Market Building Blocks of Energy Infrastructure”, which sets out the detailed components of the framework. It should be noted that both of these reports (D1.1 and D4.1) were written for the purposeof facilitating agreement regarding the details of the approach and consequently they are quite complex. Other reports later in the project will present the information in a more accessible manner for people not closely involved with the work; those later reports are commended to the general reader as a more suitable starting point. Nevertheless, D1.1 and D4.1 are made available for completeness.

The overall purpose of Work Packages 1 and 4 is to provide a holistic,Multi Criteria Assessment (MCA) of what “good looks like” for successful mass deployment and useof ULEVs, and to help understand how effectively the choices fit together across the 4 overarching Dimensions that are being considered:
  1. Customer Proposition(CP)–what the customer sees at the point interacting with a ULEV e.g. is the customer buying or leasing the vehicle
  2. Physical SupplyChain(PSC)–the technologies and infrastructure required to deliver the vehicles and their energy requirements
  3. Commercial Value Chain(CVC)–the commercial entities (and their business models) that sit across one or more parts of the PSC to collectively deliver the CP that the consumer sees –e.g. an electricity retail supplier
  4. Market and Policy Framework (MPF)–Government intervention in the form of setting the overarching market framework for commercial entities (e.g. regulated monopolies for network infrastructure) or more direct policy intervention (e.g. in terms of taxes or subsidies on commercial entities or directly at the point of the consumer
This will be examined int terms of the following narratives, that will be assessed using the analytical framework, answering key questions specific to that narrative:
  • OEM innovation
    • To what extent is incremental/organic improvement delivered primarily via OEMs, with limited Government support, sufficient to deliver mass uptake and use of ULEVs?
    • To what extent does this complicate the delivery of new large-scale supporting infrastructure, in particular with respect to the role of hydrogen?
  • City led
    • What is the value of a partial shift towards delivering mobility as a service in urban areas where this appears more viable (e.g. in terms of requiring fewer vehicles with higher utilisation)?
  • ULEV enabled
    • To what extent does a more coordinated, but technology neutral, push for ULEVs facilitate their uptake and use?
    • What are the additional costs and broader requirements for providing a meaningful hedge such that mass rollout of either PIVs and/or hydrogen vehicles could both be undertaken in the later stages of the pathway to 2050?
  • Hydrogen push
    • How effective is a coordinated push towards hydrogen as the primary ULEV route, given that this mirrors many of the current aspects of the customer proposition (e.g. owning asset, no range issues, ‘hub’ refuelling) as current ICEs and liquid refuelling infrastructure?
    • Is this route materially more expensive compared to other Narratives (such as City-led and Transport on demand) which tend towards electric vehicles and where does this cost difference materialise (e.g. fuel production versus additional infrastructure), and how effectively does early coordinated action reduce these costs?
  • Transport on demand
    • What is the value of a systemic, coordinated shift towards delivering mobility as a service, going significantly beyond that in the City-led Narrative (e.g. in terms of requiring fewer vehicles with higher utilisation)?
    • How significant are the implications likely to be for consumers as part of this shift and can the savings from better integrated services be used to compensate for any perceived or material reduction in an individual’s ‘transport utility’ (e.g. less convenience)?
Associated Project(s) ETI-TR1006: Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI)
Associated Dataset(s) No associated datasets
Associated Publication(s)

An affordable and effective route to decarbonising transport - Presentation

An ETI Perspective - Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI): Understanding the changes needed to markets and energy supply to encourage a wider take up of plug-in vehicles

An ETI Perspective - The route to a low cost, low carbon light vehicle transition

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI) - D3.2. Battery State of Health Model (Excel model)

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI) - D3.2. Battery State of Health Model Report

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI) - D4.1. Initial Analysis of Technology, Commercial and Market Building Blocks for Energy Infrastructure

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI): D4.1. Initial Analysis of Technology, Commercial and Market Building Blocks for Energy Infrastructure (Excel model)

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI) - D4.2. Final Analysis of Technology, Commercial and Market Building Blocks for Energy Infrastructure (Excel model)

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI): Fleet Study Report

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI) project - Overview Presentation 2017

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI) Project Summary - Presentation 2016

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI) project Summary - Presentation 2017

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration (CVEI): Supplementary Details of Design, Materials and Management Arrangements for Consumer Trials

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D1.3. Market Design and System Integration (full report)

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D1.3. Market Design and System Integration (summary report)

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D1.4. Stage 2 Trial Design, Methodology and Business Case

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D2.1. Consumer attitudes and behaviours report

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D3.1. Battery Cost and Performance and Battery Management System Capability Report and Battery Database (Excel model)

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D3.1. Battery Cost and Performance and Battery Management System Capability Report and Battery Database Report

Consumers, Vehicles and Energy Integration Project - D4.2. Final Analysis of Technology, Commercial and Market Building Blocks for Energy Infrastructure Report

ETI Insights Report - Transport - An affordable transition to sustainable and secure energy for light vehicles in the UK

Infographic - 10 years of innovation - Light Duty Vehicles

Real world intelligent charging for the mass market - Presentation

Transport - An affordable transition to sustainable and secure energy for light vehicles in the UK - Full Report

Vehicle electrification impacts - Presentation