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Reference Number InnUK/102351/01
Title Forecasting Climate Change Impacts on Urban Electricity Distribution Network Loads
Status Completed
Energy Categories OTHER POWER and STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES(Electricity transmission and distribution) 100%;
Research Types Applied Research and Development 100%
Science and Technology Fields PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS (Applied Mathematics) 50%;
ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) 25%;
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences) 25%;
UKERC Cross Cutting Characterisation Not Cross-cutting 100%
Principal Investigator Project Contact
No email address given
Element Energy
Award Type Collaborative Research & Development
Funding Source Innovate-UK
Start Date 01 July 2015
End Date 31 March 2017
Duration 21 months
Total Grant Value £243,869
Industrial Sectors
Region East of England
Programme Competition Call: 1412_CRD2_FUT_CIT_SUCD - Solving Urban Challenges with Data - CRD. Activity Solving urban challenges with data
 
Investigators Principal Investigator Project Contact , Element Energy (80.226%)
  Other Investigator Project Contact , Met Office (19.774%)
  Industrial Collaborator Project Contact , UK Power Networks (Operations) Limited (0.000%)
Web Site
Objectives
Abstract Growing electricity demand and on-site generation in urban areas means that urban electricity networks require significant reinforcement. Much of the 43 billion that distribution network operators (DNOs) in the UK are forecast to spend out to 2050 on reinforcing the electricity networks feeding UK homes and businesses is expected to be deployed in constrained urban areas. While DNOs currently have access to load forecasting tools to plan this investment process by specific region and individual asset, there is currently no way of quantifying how climate change impacts on demand (e.g. more summer cooling and less winter heating) and distributed generation (e.g. changing average solar insolation and wind levels) will influence the extent of urban network upgrades required. To solve this problem, we will research and develop a full commercial tool integrating Met Office climate forecast data with DNO load data to identify the size and network location of potential climate change load impacts on urban electricity networks, resolved to individual network assets (all London primary substations in the first instance) under various climate change scenarios.Growing electricity demand and on-site generation in urban areas means that urban electricity networks require significant reinforcement. Much of the 43 billion that distribution network operators (DNOs) in the UK are forecast to spend out to 2050 on reinforcing the electricity networks feeding UK homes and businesses is expected to be deployed in constrained urban areas. While DNOs currently have access to load forecasting tools to plan this investment process by specific region and individual asset, there is currently no way of quantifying how climate change impacts on demand (e.g. more summer cooling and less winter heating) and distributed generation (e.g. changing average solar insolation and wind levels) will influence the extent of urban network upgrades required. To solve this problem, we will research and develop a full commercial tool integrating Met Office climate forecast data with DNO load data to identify the size and network location of potential climate change load impacts on urban electricity networks, resolved to individual network assets (all London primary substations in the first instance) under various climate change scenarios.Growing electricity demand and on-site generation in urban areas means that urban electricity networks require significant reinforcement. Much of the 43 billion that distribution network operators (DNOs) in the UK are forecast to spend out to 2050 on reinforcing the electricity networks feeding UK homes and businesses is expected to be deployed in constrained urban areas. While DNOs currently have access to load forecasting tools to plan this investment process by specific region and individual asset, there is currently no way of quantifying how climate change impacts on demand (e.g. more summer cooling and less winter heating) and distributed generation (e.g. changing average solar insolation and wind levels) will influence the extent of urban network upgrades required. To solve this problem, we will research and develop a full commercial tool integrating Met Office climate forecast data with DNO load data to identify the size and network location of potential climate change load impacts on urban electricity networks, resolved to individual network assets (all London primary substations in the first instance) under various climate change scenarios.
Publications (none)
Final Report (none)
Added to Database 01/12/17