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Reference Number RES332250009
Title Policy drivers and barriers for sustainable innovation
Status Completed
Energy Categories RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES 25%;
OTHER POWER and STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES(Energy storage) 25%;
OTHER CROSS-CUTTING TECHNOLOGIES or RESEARCH(Environmental, social and economic impacts) 25%;
NOT ENERGY RELATED 25%;
Research Types Basic and strategic applied research 100%
Science and Technology Fields SOCIAL SCIENCES (Economics and Econometrics) 25%;
SOCIAL SCIENCES (Business and Management Studies) 50%;
SOCIAL SCIENCES (Politics and International Studies) 25%;
UKERC Cross Cutting Characterisation Sociological economical and environmental impact of energy (Policy and regulation) 100%
Principal Investigator Professor PJG (Peter ) Pearson
No email address given
Architecture
Cardiff University
Award Type Standard
Funding Source ESRC
Start Date 01 October 2002
End Date 31 December 2004
Duration 27 months
Total Grant Value £210,007
Industrial Sectors No relevance to Underpinning Sectors
Region Wales
Programme ESRC Energy
 
Investigators Principal Investigator Professor PJG (Peter ) Pearson , Architecture, Cardiff University (99.992%)
  Other Investigator Prof M (Matthew ) Leach , Centre for Environmental Strategy, University of Surrey (0.001%)
Professor M (Michael ) Grubb , Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London (0.001%)
Dr R (Rob ) Gross , Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London (0.001%)
Dr TJ Foxon , School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds (0.001%)
Dr S (Susan ) Mourato , Department of Geography and Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) (0.001%)
Professor D (Dennis ) Anderson (Dec'd) , Centre for Energy Policy and Technology, Imperial College London (0.001%)
Mr Z (Zen ) Makuch , Centre for Energy Policy and Technology, Imperial College London (0.001%)
Prof C (Colin ) Thirtle , Centre for Energy Policy and Technology, Imperial College London (0.001%)
Web Site
Objectives Objectives not suppliedObjectives not suppliedObjectives not supplied
Abstract This project investigated the role of policy and regulatory instruments in promoting or inhibiting the innovation and take up of more sustainable technologies and processes. By undertaking theoretical analysis and gathering empirical evidence through case studies and stakeholder workshops, the project produced process guidelines for the development of improved policy processes and of better mixes of policy instruments for promoting sustainable innovation. Two case studies were undertaken. Thefirst examined the influence of policies on the innovation of low carbon technologies in the UK, and included contributions from a project team member (Foxon) to ongoing policy processes relating to innovation in UK renewable energy technology systems. The second case study focussed on EC policy-making processes relating to alternative technologies as energy sources for vehicles, taking advantage of direct involvement by a project team member (Makuch) in consultations and ongoing revisions ofthe EC Batteries and Accumulators Directive (Batteries Directive) including the Extended Impact Assessment process and the End-of-Life Vehicle Directive. Four stakeholder workshops were held during theproject, involving both national and international representatives of the policy-making, business, NGO and academic communities. Policy-making frameworks in the UK were compared with those in other European countries, notably the Dutch Transition Approach, including interactions with policy-makers in these countries and at the European Commission (EC). Based on the theoretical developments and evidence gathered during the project, ‘sustainable innovation policy process guidance’ was produced and tested at the later stakeholder workshops. This guidance describes and discusses five ‘guiding principles’, including the development of a more integrated mix of policy processes, measures and instruments. The guidance is outlined in a report for policy-makers whichwas formally launchedata seminar organised by the HEED (Heterodox Economics for Environment and Development) Network at the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) on 14th April 2005.This project investigated the role of policy and regulatory instruments in promoting or inhibiting the innovation and take up of more sustainable technologies and processes. By undertaking theoretical analysis and gathering empirical evidence through case studies and stakeholder workshops, the project produced process guidelines for the development of improved policy processes and of better mixes of policy instruments for promoting sustainable innovation. Two case studies were undertaken. Thefirst examined the influence of policies on the innovation of low carbon technologies in the UK, and included contributions from a project team member (Foxon) to ongoing policy processes relating to innovation in UK renewable energy technology systems. The second case study focussed on EC policy-making processes relating to alternative technologies as energy sources for vehicles, taking advantage of direct involvement by a project team member (Makuch) in consultations and ongoing revisions ofthe EC Batteries and Accumulators Directive (Batteries Directive) including the Extended Impact Assessment process and the End-of-Life Vehicle Directive. Four stakeholder workshops were held during theproject, involving both national and international representatives of the policy-making, business, NGO and academic communities. Policy-making frameworks in the UK were compared with those in other European countries, notably the Dutch Transition Approach, including interactions with policy-makers in these countries and at the European Commission (EC). Based on the theoretical developments and evidence gathered during the project, ‘sustainable innovation policy process guidance’ was produced and tested at the later stakeholder workshops. This guidance describes and discusses five ‘guiding principles’, including the development of a more integrated mix of policy processes, measures and instruments. The guidance is outlined in a report for policy-makers whichwas formally launchedata seminar organised by the HEED (Heterodox Economics for Environment and Development) Network at the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) on 14th April 2005.This project investigated the role of policy and regulatory instruments in promoting or inhibiting the innovation and take up of more sustainable technologies and processes. By undertaking theoretical analysis and gathering empirical evidence through case studies and stakeholder workshops, the project produced process guidelines for the development of improved policy processes and of better mixes of policy instruments for promoting sustainable innovation. Two case studies were undertaken. Thefirst examined the influence of policies on the innovation of low carbon technologies in the UK, and included contributions from a project team member (Foxon) to ongoing policy processes relating to innovation in UK renewable energy technology systems. The second case study focussed on EC policy-making processes relating to alternative technologies as energy sources for vehicles, taking advantage of direct involvement by a project team member (Makuch) in consultations and ongoing revisions ofthe EC Batteries and Accumulators Directive (Batteries Directive) including the Extended Impact Assessment process and the End-of-Life Vehicle Directive. Four stakeholder workshops were held during theproject, involving both national and international representatives of the policy-making, business, NGO and academic communities. Policy-making frameworks in the UK were compared with those in other European countries, notably the Dutch Transition Approach, including interactions with policy-makers in these countries and at the European Commission (EC). Based on the theoretical developments and evidence gathered during the project, ‘sustainable innovation policy process guidance’ was produced and tested at the later stakeholder workshops. This guidance describes and discusses five ‘guiding principles’, including the development of a more integrated mix of policy processes, measures and instruments. The guidance is outlined in a report for policy-makers whichwas formally launchedata seminar organised by the HEED (Heterodox Economics for Environment and Development) Network at the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) on 14th April 2005.
Publications (none)
Final Report (none)
Added to Database 31/10/11